…..its been a while…..human trafficking competition entry

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This is the photograph I entered to the competition on Human Trafficking. It has been shortlisted but now needs to be “liked” as much as possible on the relevant facebook sites.  All likes appreciated…. This is how it works…… Dear Dola I wish to advise you that your competition entry has been short-listed as one of the top twelve scoring entries – congratulations on this achievement . Your image has now been uploaded to our Facebook page and the OCTF’s. Facebook page and members of the public are invited to “like” the entries they would like to win.  The number of likes on each entry will be added to your overall score which was awarded by the independent judging panel.  The 6 entries with the combined highest marks will win a prize. You can view your entry on our Facebook pages here: 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Anti-Human-Trafficking-Unit-Ireland/305656599447325#!/pages/Anti-Human-Trafficking-Unit-Ireland/305656599447325

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Anti-Human-Trafficking-Unit-Ireland/305656599447325#!/pages/Organised-Crime-Task-Force-Northern-Ireland/136184833076303?fref=ts           

 Good luck!

Anti-Human Trafficking Unit Ireland

 

….the art of Charwei Tsai………

Charwei Tsai | Taiwan b. 1980 | <i>Mushroom mantra </i>2008 | Black ink on fresh mushrooms | Dimensions variable | Image courtesy: The artist

Charwei Tsai is known for her contemplative installations, which explore concepts of personal transformation and compassion. Born in Taiwan, Tsai grew up reciting the Buddhist prajnaparamita or Heart Sutra as a way of dispelling fears and calming her mind. She studied industrial design at the Rhode Island School of Design and later moved to New York, where she worked for artist Cai Guo-Qiang. Tsai became interested in the creative process as a way in which she could explore ideas of the transcendence of the self. Although Tsai does not consider herself religious, she returned to the central learning of the Heart Sutra – which relates to the transience of the individual and the universe – and found resonances between it and her developing understanding of art and its transformative nature. Tsai’s engagement with the prajnaparamita has also become a performative one, involving her painstaking inscription of this revered Buddhist text onto organic materials, such as tofu, mushrooms and flowers.

http://qagoma.qld.gov.au