….meditative painting……Pracha Yindee……

Pracha is one of Thailand’s most recognized meditative painters. First he meditates to find harmony and inner peace, to reflect on his feelings and the impermanence of all thing. And then, he stands up and infuses his papers with fluid brushstrokes of a rare intensity. He has a unique ability to create continuous and deep movements of colours, always changing, evolving into new shapes.

http://artabstract2009-artabstract2009.blogspot.ie/2011_11_01_archive.html

…..sumi-e art…..

A selection of the sumi-e paintings that sung to me today……..

Wonderful, this road to Cold Mountain —
Yet there’s no sign of horse or carriage.
In winding valleys too tortuous to trace,
On crags piled who knows how high . . . 
Han-shan (from #48 of “Cold Mountain”)

http://tokaido.wordpress.com/2008/01/30/vintage-japanese-shikishi-art-sumi-e-suibokuga-nihonga/

http://robertsloan2.hubpages.com/hub/Seven-Tips-for-Sumi-E-Painting

Sumi-e’ is painting what is not there!

http://urbanresearch.wordpress.com/2008/11/13/modern-sumi-e-painting/

http://artinthemoment.com/what_is_sumie.htm

…on zen art……sumi-e…….

Oriental artists are not interested in a photographic representation of an object but in interpreting its spirits . . . . Occidental art . . . exalts personality, is anthropocentric . . . . Oriental art . . . has been cosmocentric. It sees man as an integral part of nature . . . . The affinity between man and nature was what impressed Oriental artists rather than their contrast, as in the West. To Occidentals, the physical world was an objective reality–to be analyzed, used, mastered. To Orientals, on the contrary, it was a realm of beauty to be admired, but also of mystery and illusion to be pictured by poets, explained by mythmakers, and mollified by priestly incantations. This contrast between East and West had incalculable influence on their respective arts, as well as on their philosophies and religions. (1963:253-255).

Art in the West has developed a complex linguistic symbolism through which the artist manipulates his material to communicate something to his audience. Art as communication is basic to Western aesthetics, as is the corollary interrelationship of form and content. Music is considered a language of feeling (Hanslick 1957) and consists of”sonorous moving forms.” A landscape painting in the Western tradition is not merely an aesthetically pleasing reproduction; the artist uses his techniques of balance, perspective, and color, to express a personal reaction to the landscape–his painting is a frozen human mood. The aesthetic object is used as a link between the audience and the artist’s feelings. And the artist’s technique is used to create an illusion of the forms of reality.

The Zen artist, on the other hand, tries to suggest by the simplest possible means the inherent nature of the aesthetic object. Anything may be painted, or expressed in poetry, and any sounds may become music. The job of the artist is to suggest the essence, the eternal qualities of the object, which is in itself a work of natural art before the artist arrives on the scene. In order to achieve this, the artist must fully understand the inner nature of the aesthetic object, its Buddha nature. This is the hard part. Technique, though important, is useless without it; and the actual execution of the art work may be startlingly spontaneous, once the artist has comprehended the essence of his subject.

Belief in the superiority of spiritual mastery over technical mastery is evidenced by numerous stories of bushido matches (Japanese sword fighting) in which untrained monks defeated trained samurai because they naturally comprehended the basic nature of the bushido contest, and had no fear of death whatsoever.

A Chinese painter was once commissioned to paint the Emperor’s favorite goat. The artist asked for the goat, that he might study it. After two years the Emperor, growing impatient, asked for the return of the goat; the artist obliged. Then the Emperor asked about the painting. The artist confessed that he had not yet made one, and taking an ink brush he drew eight nonchalant strokes, creating the most perfect goat in the annals of Chinese painting.

The style of painting favored by Zen artists makes use of a horsehair brush, black ink, and either paper or silk. It is known as sumi-e. The great economy of means is necessary to express the purity and simplicity of the eternal nature of the subject, and also because it is a generalizing factor. Zen art does not try to create the illusion of reality. It abandons true to life perspective, and works with artificial space relations which make one think beyond reality into the essence of reality. This concept of essence as opposed to illusion is basic to Zen art in all phases.

http://tokaido.wordpress.com/2008/01/30/vintage-japanese-shikishi-art-sumi-e-suibokuga-nihonga/

http://artsites.ucsc.edu/faculty/lieberman/zen.html

…..more from dzigar kongtrul rinpoche………….

Artist’s Statement

For me, painting is a means to express the truth one discovers through meditation. The essential practice of meditation is to allow the mind to express itself freely without fear or judgment. In each moment of awareness we encounter impressions of the outer world through our sense perceptions as well as our inner world of thoughts, feelings and emotions. When we are able to let this incredible array of experience be, without trying to reject what we fear or pull in what we are attracted to—when we relax into experience without trying to manipulate it in any way—we have a complete experience of mind, naked and unaltered. Painting, when it is free of such notions as beauty and ugliness or should and shouldn’t, can be used to express this complete experience of mind. When art evolves from this understanding it provides the possibility for those who see it to also experience the unfabricated nature of their own mind.

http://www.kongtruljigme.com

When we trust our creativity we encounter a supreme kind of enjoyment –
an amazement at the natural unfolding of life
beyond our ordinary way of looking at things.

Meeting reality directly requires confidence in the fundamentally positive nature of our being. The more we trust what arises in our mind to come from this creative source, the more we can let the mind be as it is, rather than approach it with judgment, fear or manipulation based on our likes and dislikes. My hope is that my paintings communicate the beauty of this unhindered practice of free expression.
~ Kongtrul Jigme Namgye

http://www.theawakenedeye.com